Kiss Kiss music review – Reality vs the Optimist

Kiss Kiss music review - Reality vs the Optimist

Kiss Kiss are guitary, screamy, haunting, romantic, optimistic about our reality – they have a huge following yet always say thank you for their fan art. For their classical influences and calming yet awakening way of playing, Velma Velvet gives them 4 out of five stars.

On my latest search for music enlightenment I sit at my computer screen and click through Myspace profiles with the boredom that usually accompanies spending all day on Myspace anyway.

My mouse finally settles on the name of a person who’s on my friend’s list, but who I really even don’t know anyway, and I click. The page loads and almost as if it’s fate, my ears are field with the sound of… classical music?

Before I have a chance to really assess exactly what genre I’m listening to a series of hard guitars follow in – although it’s not with Slipknot’s thrashing sound. Think Beethoven getting a Stratocaster for his birthday. Soon a violin sneaks in underneath all that riveting guitar. It’s a gentle instrument yet it doesn’t allow itself to get lost in the onslaught of streaming sporadic rifts – that violin ascends and dominates the stronger instruments with a classic horror grace.

Okay, so this is in the past. But the song I had been listening to that day was “The Cats in Your House”, by Kiss Kiss, who’d released their second album “Reality vs. The Optimist” in 2007.

Kiss Kiss is a band of five: Josh (Synths, Guitar, Vocals), Rebecca (Violin, Vocals), Mike (Guitar, Synths, Vocals), Patrick (Bass, Vocals), Jared (Drums, Percussion).

“The Cats in your House”, track 8 on “Reality vs. The Optimist”, is not even the best one. A personal favourite is “Dress Up”, which picks up fast and is one of the songs where lead vocalist Josh uses his amazing screaming ability. A chainsaw’s in there somewhere. Yes, in this song an actual chainsaw is used as a supplement to the Tim Burton-esque melody and speedy violin.

Soon, I’m led into a gentler song. It starts off a bit more poppy than the rest, but a beauteous violin can be found in “Vagabond” along with softer, breathier vocals reminiscent of a whispering midnight lover. Its ghostly essence haunts me, and even as I’m feeling all haunted the tempo increases with more guitarage until a finale which astonishes.

Now that I’ve finally managed to catch my breath, let’s break down the lyrics. Kiss Kiss lyrics are never long sentences and their format tends to be a broken down, free verse poem which adds to their ethereal vibe.

Here’s a lovely line from “Machines”:

Time, To Show the Machines/How We all Breathe/Let Them Inside/To Manage our Dreams.

It’s a really nice line that addresses the uncontrolled spread of technology in our lives. I love how they add such romance to worldly issues.

Kiss Kiss are guitary, screamy, haunting, romantic, and like their album title suggests, optimistic about our reality. For their classical influences and calming yet awakening way of playing, I give them 4 out of five stars.


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