Teen plastic surgery

Teen plastic surgery

“Plastic surgeons are always making mountains out of molehills.” – Dolly Parton

School used to be a confusing place filled with spots and mockery. Now it’s a confusing place filled with spots, mockery, eating disorders and plastic surgery dreams. Paris Hilton, the media, parents and Dr. Michael Salzhauer – step into the dock!

I’m a firm believer that over the past five years generations of children in the UK have changed dramatically. School was still a confusing place to be most of the time; spots and homemade haircuts were still punishable by mockery and a dead arm, and the smelly kid still got bullied. Things like that don’t change. Forgive me for echoing your parent’s words with “in my day”, but when I was at school all that mattered was the right branded shoes, a limited knowledge of cheap alcoholic beverages and getting a snog on Friday night. You were only considered very cool if you had a connection to gain access to cider and fags.

I don’t remember there being immense pressure on me or my friends to be stick thin. However, this was when size zero wasn’t publicised as anything other than an eating disorder, and The Hills was just a dream. So it never crossed my mind as a teenager that I might ever want to go into modelling. After all, I knew I wouldn’t be able to pose on a car whilst being allowed to eat a Mars Bar.

We all know what happens with American trends directly influencing the other side of the pond. Paris ‘inheritance’ Hilton gets a designer bag for her dog and soon the hoardes are buying rat-sized pets to keep in their luggage. Personally, I think no amount of money makes Prada that smells like dog fart acceptable.

The media (both the evil and saintly sides of the coin) have bombarded us for the last few years with the beautiful dream of models and countless lifestyle makeover shows. Now (surprise!) they are starting to report high numbers of children and teens claiming to want plastic surgery. Those children will soon be adding nose jobs to their Christmas list. In America, it’s already documented that teens are asking for plastic surgery – and getting it, because their parents think it will make them happier or aid them in their future life the way, say, a college education will. Their parents, children themselves in many ways, fed by The Dream, are getting their priorities seriously screwed.

Dr. Michael Salzhauer, a surgeon from California, has written the first book about cosmetic surgery aimed at small children. The book is called


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